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Darby Maloney is a writer from San Juan, Trinidad. She writes short stories, poetry, and a children’s Heroes of Trinidad and Tobago series which includes Russell Latapy: The Little Magician (2007) and Stephen Ames: Trinidad’s Ace Golfer (2008). Darby has lived in eleven states and three countries, and currently resides in Southampton, New York and Trinidad and Tobago.

Steven Schwartz is an American author. He grew up outside Chester, Pennsylvania, and has lived in Colorado for the past thirty-two years. He is the author of four story collections, Little Raw Souls (Autumn House), To Leningrad in Winter (University of Missouri), Lives of the Fathers (University of Illinois), Madagascar: New and Selected Stories (Engine Books), and two novels, Therapy (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) and A Good Doctor’s Son (William Morrow). His fiction has received the Nelson Algren Award, the Sherwood Anderson Prize, the Cohen Award, the Colorado Book Award for the Novel, two O. Henry Prize Story Awards, the Foreword Review Gold Medal for Short Stories, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, MacDowell, and Bread Loaf. His essays have appeared in The Massachusetts Review, The Gettysburg Review, Crazyhorse, Image, and have been awarded the Cleanth Brooks Prize in Nonfiction from The Southern Review. He teaches in the low-residency writing program at Warren Wilson College and the MFA program at Colorado State University, where he also serves as fiction editor for the Colorado Review. Married to the writer Emily Hammond, they have two grown children.

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Abraham (Bram) Stoker was and Irish writer, best known as the author of the Gothic horror tale Dracula. He was born in November 8, 1847 in Dublin. His father was a civil servant and his mother was a charity worker and writer. Stoker was a sickly child and spent a lot of time in bed. In 1864 Stoker entered Trinity College Dublin. While attending college he began working as an Irish civil servant. He also worked part time as a freelance journalist and drama critic. In 1876 he met Henry Irving, a famous actor, and they soon became friends. Not long after that, Stoker met and fell in love with an aspiring actress named Florence Balcombe. In 1878 Stoker accepted a job working in London as Irving’s personal secretary. On December that year, Stoker and his new wife moved to England to join Irving. His first book The Duties of Clerks of Petty Sessions in Ireland though written while he was still in Dublin, was published in 1879. Turning to fiction late in life, Stoker published his first novelThe Snake’s Pass, a romantic thriller with a bleak western Ireland setting, in 1890. His masterpiece, Dracula, appeared in 1897. While in England Stoker also wrote several novels and short stories. Two years after Stoker’s death, his widow, Florence Stoker, published as part of a posthumous collection of short stories Dracula’s Guest, which, most contemporary scholars believe, text editors had excised from the original Dracula manuscript. Although best known for “Dracula”, Stoker wrote eighteen books before his death in 1912. He died of exhaustion at the age of 64.

Washington Irving was born in New York in 1783 to a family of Scottish origin. Irving was the youngest of 11 children, only eight of which survived to reach adulthood. Also a historian and a biographer, Irving became one of the first American writers to be widely accepted in Europe as an American author. Irving is thought to have been the first American author whose stories take place in the United States. Irving died at the age of 76 in Tarrytown, New York, where Sunnyside, his homestead, has become a tourist attraction.

Jack London was born in San Francisco in 1876. In his earlier years, he worked, among other occupations, as a fisherman, a journalist, and as a sailor. As part of the Gold Rush, London went to Alaska but returned from there penniless. These experiences greatly influenced his literary writing. Among his best-known works are the novels The Call of the Wind, The Sea-Wolf, White Fang and The Iron Heel, as well as the short story “To Build a Fire,” which was written and published in two different versions. His writing is known to have an influence on naturalism in literature and on the genre of science fiction. London died in 1916, at the age of forty.

Elisa R.V. García is a Mexican author and researcher living in Germany. She has a PhD in comparative literature from Aarhus University (Denmark). Elisa writes mostly in English, but she has authored non-fiction in Spanish and German as well. In her short stories she likes to explore questions dealing with identity, foreignness, and the complexity of human relationships. Her short stories have appeared in “Thrice Fiction” and “The Literary Nest”. Her most recent work will be published in “Oddville Press” in the spring of 2018.

Johnny Gruelle was an American author and illustrator best known for his children’s series Raggedy Ann and Andy, as well as the very popular Mr. Twee Deedle cartoon. He was born December 24th, 1880 in Arcola, Illinois. Johnny Gruelle eventually created over forty Raggedy Ann and Andy books, all capturing his unique version of childhood.

Writer, poet, and playwright Gertrude Stein was born in 1874 to a Jewish family of German origin in Pennsylvania. In the 1920s, she moved to Paris, France, where she established a literary salon which became a house to renowned authors such as Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald, and artists Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. In her literary writings, Stein developed the stream of consciousness technique and made significant use of the concept of the subconscious. Stein died in Paris in 1946 and was buried there.

Katherine Mansfield, pseudonym of Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp was a New Zealand-born English master of the short story, who evolved a distinctive prose style with many overtones of poetry. Her delicate stories, focused upon psychological conflicts, have an obliqueness of narration and a subtlety of observation that reveal the influence of Anton Chekhov. She, in turn, had much influence on the development of the short story as a form of literature. She was born in 1888 in Wellington and left New Zealand at the age of 19 to establish herself in England as a writer. Her initial disillusion appears in the ill-humoured stories collected in In a German Pension (1911). Until 1914 she published stories in Rhythm and The Blue Review, edited by the critic and essayist John Middleton Murry, whom she married in 1918 after her divorce from George Bowden. The death of her soldier brother in 1915 shocked her into a recognition that she owed what she termed a sacred debt to him and to the remembered places of her native country. Prelude (1918) was a series of short stories beautifully evocative of her family memories of New Zealand. These, with others, were collected in Bliss (1920), which secured her reputation and is typical of her art. In the next two years Mansfield did her best work, achieving the height of her powers in The Garden Party (1922), which includes the classic “Daughters of the Late Colonel,” a subtle account of genteel frustration. The last five years of her life were shadowed by tuberculosis. She died in 1923 in France. Her final work (apart from unfinished material) was published posthumously in The Dove’s Nest (1923) and Something Childish (1924). From her papers, Murry edited the Journal (1954), and he also published with annotations her letters to him (1951). Also were published her collected letters (1984–2008) and Mansfield’s notebooks (1997).

Born in 1871 in Newark, New Jersey, author and poet Stephen Crane is considered to have influenced American literature, among others the writing of Ernest Hemingway. Crane grew up in a Methodist family and began writing at the age of four. As a journalist, he was sent to Cuba as a military correspondent, when the ship sank off the coast of Florida, an incident he has later depicted in his short story, “The Open Boat.” Later, he served as a military correspondent in Greece and then moved to England. Crane died in 1900 from tuberculosis, at the age of 28, at a sanatorium in Germany.

The Short Story Project C | The Short Story Project INC 2018

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